Mashable Summit: Great video content…

Posted on June 8, 2010 by

0


So it is lunch here in New York, in the NY Times Conference Center. The morning at #mashablesummit has been interesting. A lot of content. The event has been mainly experience sharing and storytelling.

The experience from CollegeHumour.com was quite unique. They now build professional viral videos, the few shown during the session were very funny. The take away from the talk seems so obvious but is consistently forgotten; create content for the user!

This seems so simple, but how many creative meetings lose that focus, or how many job ads forget what the user (job seeker) might actually want. Is the advert full of what policy states, what SEO is needed, etc? If the advert was a CV or Resume would you read it or trash it?

How will people find the web video content? Just putting it in YouTube alone is not enough for a serious campaign. A few strategies to help people find the content include:

-Seed strategy to give push, buy some traffic to kick start the viral.
-Team up with an established brand making the most of their Twitter followers, email subs etc.

Popular myth; we have no idea why things go viral. While it is true that the content type and audience etc are all different the common theme is the video gives the users a reason to pass it on. It says something about the user when they send it on. It makes the individual look in the know, or cool.

So don’t focus on the video, focus on the user. The research around the online video states that attention span is 20 seconds, so the video hook has to be in that first 20 secs.

Should you build community tools from scratch? Or keep it open using existing tools? Get it out fast, use existing platforms that have constantly improving features such as Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, YouTube, etc.

For recruitment should we keep things professional? No! Users want to know who the company is, they want to engage, they dont want faceless video. If the video is a viral campaign, it needs to be brave which may need to break conventional marketing policy.

For a job board job ads are content, for a job seeker job ads are content, for a career site job ads are content. Think about it…